Manage the Mean Monday

📷 Part 4: Aggressive Behavior in Dementia Some people with Alzheimer’s or dementia may enter a combative stage of dementia. This is a normal part of the disease and can happen even if your older adult’s typical personality has been kind and non-violent throughout their lives. It’s caused by the damage that’s happening in their brain. Because they’re not able to clearly communicate their needs, people with dementia may lash out when they’re afraid, frustrated, angry, or in

Manage the Mean Monday

Part 3: Ways to Reduce & Manage Mean Behavior 1. Calm the situation down The first thing to do is reduce the tension in the room. Start by limiting the distractions in the room, like turning off the TV or asking others to leave. And if you stay calm, they’re also more likely to calm down. Repeat to yourself “it’s the disease” as a reminder that they’re not intentionally doing this. If the current activity seemed to cause the agitation, try shifting to a more pleasant, calm

Manage the Mean Monday

Part 2: Why Someone with Dementia Says Mean Things First, it’s important to understand why this hurtful behavior is happening. Dementia is a brain disease that causes parts of the brain to shrink and lose their function, resulting in cognitive impairment. These different parts control functions like memory, personality, behavior, and speech. Dementia also damages the ability to control impulses, which means actions aren’t intentional. Even though it’s difficult, do your be

Manage the Mean Monday

Part 1 - Hurtful Things They May Say People with dementia might say hurtful things When you’re caring for an older adult with Alzheimer’s disease or dementia, they might make mean comments, use hurtful words, or accuse you of terrible (but untrue) things. It’s devastating to hear, but the most important thing to remember is that their disease is causing the behavior. Your older adult isn’t purposely saying these things to hurt you. The damage in their brain is causing it. H

Ways a Caregiver Can Encourage Independence

4 Ways a Caregiver Can Encourage a Loved One's Independence by Barry J. Jacobs, AARP Caregiving is not babysitting. Let those who can...do! During the years I provided loving care for my mother, I learned that helping her too much created its own set of problems. She was physically hampered by chronic knee and back pain; her thinking was marred by memory and language deficits caused by mild dementia. I thought it was my duty to do all I could to take care of her every need

Table Talk Tuesday: Does Your Aging Parent Need Help Series

Mike Campbell | Updated June 9, 2020 Part 5: Warning Signs Dementia, Alzheimer’s Disease or Some Other Cognitive Impairment How will you know when your elderly parents need help at home? One thing is certain: your parents aren’t likely to be the ones who tell you they need a helping hand! Admitting the need for help and accepting assistance are not easy for people as they age. One way to avoid this is to start regularly monitoring your parents’ physical and mental abilities

Table Talk Tuesday: Does Your Aging Parent Need Help Series

Part 4: Physical Clues That Your Parents Are Neglecting Household Responsibilities How will you know when your elderly parents need help at home? One thing is certain: your parents aren’t likely to be the ones who tell you they need a helping hand! Admitting the need for help and accepting assistance are not easy for people as they age. One way to avoid this is to start regularly monitoring your parents’ physical and mental abilities and researching long-term care options.

Table Talk Tuesday: Does Your Aging Parent Need Help Series

Part 3: Changes in Behavior or Mental Status How will you know when your elderly parents need help at home? One thing is certain: your parents aren’t likely to be the ones who tell you they need a helping hand! Admitting the need for help and accepting assistance are not easy for people as they age. One way to avoid this is to start regularly monitoring your parents’ physical and mental abilities and researching long-term care options. This will ensure you are prepared sho

Table Talk Tuesday: Does Your Aging Parent Need Help Series

Part 2: Changes in Physical Function or Appearance That Indicate a Need for Assistance Mike Campbell | Updated June 9, 2020 How will you know when your elderly parents need help at home? One thing is certain: your parents aren’t likely to be the ones who tell you they need a helping hand! Admitting the need for help and accepting assistance are not easy for people as they age. One way to avoid this is to start regularly monitoring your parents’ physical and mental abiliti

Table Talk Tuesday: Does Your Aging Parent Need Help Series

Part I: Signs Your Aging Parent Needs Help At Home Mike Campbell | Updated June 9, 2020 How will you know when your elderly parents need help at home? One thing is certain: your parents aren’t likely to be the ones who tell you they need a helping hand! Admitting the need for help and accepting assistance are not easy for people as they age. The responsibility often falls on family members to recognize the signs that an aging loved one might need support with completing