Table Talk Tuesday: Does Your Aging Parent Need Help Series

Mike Campbell | Updated June 9, 2020 Part 5: Warning Signs Dementia, Alzheimer’s Disease or Some Other Cognitive Impairment How will you know when your elderly parents need help at home? One thing is certain: your parents aren’t likely to be the ones who tell you they need a helping hand! Admitting the need for help and accepting assistance are not easy for people as they age. One way to avoid this is to start regularly monitoring your parents’ physical and mental abilities

Table Talk Tuesday: Does Your Aging Parent Need Help Series

Part 4: Physical Clues That Your Parents Are Neglecting Household Responsibilities How will you know when your elderly parents need help at home? One thing is certain: your parents aren’t likely to be the ones who tell you they need a helping hand! Admitting the need for help and accepting assistance are not easy for people as they age. One way to avoid this is to start regularly monitoring your parents’ physical and mental abilities and researching long-term care options.

Table Talk Tuesday: Does Your Aging Parent Need Help Series

Part 3: Changes in Behavior or Mental Status How will you know when your elderly parents need help at home? One thing is certain: your parents aren’t likely to be the ones who tell you they need a helping hand! Admitting the need for help and accepting assistance are not easy for people as they age. One way to avoid this is to start regularly monitoring your parents’ physical and mental abilities and researching long-term care options. This will ensure you are prepared sho

Table Talk Tuesday: Does Your Aging Parent Need Help Series

Part 2: Changes in Physical Function or Appearance That Indicate a Need for Assistance Mike Campbell | Updated June 9, 2020 How will you know when your elderly parents need help at home? One thing is certain: your parents aren’t likely to be the ones who tell you they need a helping hand! Admitting the need for help and accepting assistance are not easy for people as they age. One way to avoid this is to start regularly monitoring your parents’ physical and mental abiliti

Table Talk Tuesday: Does Your Aging Parent Need Help Series

Part I: Signs Your Aging Parent Needs Help At Home Mike Campbell | Updated June 9, 2020 How will you know when your elderly parents need help at home? One thing is certain: your parents aren’t likely to be the ones who tell you they need a helping hand! Admitting the need for help and accepting assistance are not easy for people as they age. The responsibility often falls on family members to recognize the signs that an aging loved one might need support with completing

Fall Prevention Friday

Create a Fall-Proof Home Environment Most falls are caused by a loss of footing (tripping) and/or traction (slipping) associated with environmental hazards. An ideal, fall-proof home features even, non-slip walking surfaces throughout. While this may seem unattainable, especially for those living in multi-level residences, there are minor changes and home modifications that can reduce an elder’s fall risk. Keep all rooms free of clutter, especially the floors. Furniture shoul

Ways a Caregiver Can Encourage Independence

by Barry J. Jacobs, AARP Caregiving is not babysitting. Let those who can...do! Many caregivers struggle with finding a balance between doing too much and too little. This is all the more complicated when a care receiver's abilities change from day to day or even hour to hour. There should be an understanding that caregivers won't take over any tasks unless they absolutely have to. But whether help is or isn't necessary is open to endless debate between earnest caregivers an

Dementia: Creating a Dementia Friendly Home

4 ways to create a dementia friendly home by making things easier to see 1. Avoid reflective surfaces and keep lighting even Shiny or reflective surfaces on floors or tabletops can cause confusion because they create glare and shadows. Floors: stick to bare hardwood or plain carpeting. Tabletops or counters : cover with light-colored mats or tablecloths. Dark colors may seem like holes, so avoid those colors on areas you do want your older adult to use. 2. Add pictures to id